The COVID-19 pandemic has now killed 5 million people around the world…

In September, visitors sit amid white flags that were part of artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg’s “In America: Remember,” a permanent art installation that commemorated Americans who have died of COVID-19, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Patrick Semansky/AP


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Patrick Semansky/AP

In September, visitors sit amid white flags that were part of artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg’s “In America: Remember,” a permanent art installation that commemorated Americans who have died of COVID-19, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Patrick Semansky/AP

Global deaths from COVID-19 have now surpassed 5 million, according to the data released Monday from Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus tracker.

The U.S. leads the world in the number of confirmed deaths from the virus with more than 745,800 people dead from COVID-19. Brazil (with more than 607,000 deaths) and India (with more than 450,000 deaths) follow the U.S. in the number of lives lost since the start of the pandemic.

however another tragic meaningful development of the pandemic comes just as the U.S. prepares to start vaccinating children between the ages of 5 and 11.

But in other parts of the world, health officials are seeing worrying signs of a coronavirus surge — just as some nations are relaxing measures to international travelers.

This official global tally only accounts for confirmed situations around the world, according to Amber D’Souza, professor of epidemiology at the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, who spoke to National Geographic.

Prior to Johns Hopkins releasing the latest global data on Monday D’Souza told the outlet: “It’s quite possible that the number of deaths is double what we see. But 5 million is such a staggering number on its own. No country has been able to escape it.”

Europe and Southeast Asia report a surge in situations

A medical worker prepares a shot of Russia’s Sputnik Lite coronavirus vaccine at a vaccination center last week in Moscow’s GUM department store in Red Square with the St. Basil Cathedral in the background. The global death toll from COVID-19 has topped 5 million.

Pavel Golovkin/AP


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Pavel Golovkin/AP

A medical worker prepares a shot of Russia’s Sputnik Lite coronavirus vaccine at a vaccination center last week in Moscow’s GUM department store in Red Square with the St. Basil Cathedral in the background. The global death toll from COVID-19 has topped 5 million.

Pavel Golovkin/AP

The World Health Organization recently reported a rise in situations in Europe during October.

As of Oct. 26, the European vicinity experienced an 18% surge in new COVID-19 situations. Southeast Asia, a vicinity experiencing a similar rise in new COVID situations, also reported a 13% increase in new COVID-19 deaths.

Globally, as of Oct. 26, the health organization reported more than 2.9 million situations and more than 49, 000 new deaths, a 4% and 5% increase respectively.

Last month, Russian officials registered the highest death toll in Europe: more than 235,000 deaths since the start of the pandemic. Due to skyrocketing infections from the delta strain, officials there launched a permanent lockdown in an attempt to defeat the virus.

But there is skepticism over whether the numbers being shared in Russia are truly the official count. Some believe the numbers may be higher.

On Friday, Reuters reported that Poland’s total number of COVID-19 situations since the start of the pandemic passed 3 million. Daily situations are quickly gaining speed as the country is in the middle of the fourth wave of the virus.

In Singapore, where officials have decided to coexist with the coronavirus and cease lockdown measures, a jump in situations has been reported there, too.

More than 80% of Singapore’s population has been immunized against COVID-19. however as of Oct. 30, situations jumped to well over 3,000 situations a day in about two months.

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